5. MARIA AS ICON/ENTREPRENEUR (FRED HARVEY, WORLDS FAIR)

Although black ware pottery received a lot of success, the true legend behind the pottery is Maria Martinez herself. She won many awards and presented her pottery at many world fairs and received the initial grant for the National Endowment for the Arts to fund a Martinez pottery workshop in 1973.

 

International Recognition for Maria

Recognition for Maria’s contributions came from many sources ranging from tribal acknowledgement of her contributions, to national recognition of her work as an artist, to international acclaim for her achievements in ceramics.  In 1925 Maria nd her husband Julian won Bes of Show at the New York Worlds Fair and eight years later won Best of Show at the Chicago Worlds Fair. Maria was a key figure in leading a pottery an cultural heritage revival, not only at San Ildefonso, but at other pueblos as well. Pottery making has become one of the most important sources of income for many of the pueblos today.

One of the most interesting citations is the French Order of Academic Palms given to outstanding educators. The honor was given to Maria in 1956 and recognized her work as a teacher in the field of ceramics.

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Maria and her students Unknown photographer Circa 1930-40 Gift of Anita Da 1984.012.014

Maria and her students
Unknown photographer
Circa 1930-40
Gift of Anita Da
1984.012.014

This photograph includes almost all of the major figures whose work was connected with Maria’s during the 1940-1970 period. From left to right: Maria Roybal, Ester Vigil, Julian Martinez (Maria’s husband), Florance Naranjo, Juanita Roybal, Josephine Roybal, Maria Martinez, Tomacita Montoya Sanchez, Clara Montoya, Crucita Calabasa (known also as Blue Corn), Tonita Pena, Lupita Martinez, Philapita Martinez Torrez.

Activities/Interactives

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